Community Resilience: Learn and Tell Toolkit - RAND Corporation

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Community Resilience LEARN

&TELL L

Toolkit

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

This toolkit was developed by RAND and informed by the Resilient DC Steering Committee and Workgroup participants and is available online at www.rand.org/pubs/ tools/TL163.html. Resilient DC is a collaborative project sponsored by the District of Columbia Department of Health that brings together residents, community-based partners, businesses, and District and Federal agencies to strengthen the community’s ability to “bounce back” from emergencies and disasters. While this toolkit was developed initially for Resilient DC, the material can be used widely across a variety of communities and settings. The research behind this toolkit was funded by a Public Health Emergency Preparedness Grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and conducted within RAND Health, a division of the RAND Corporation. A profile of RAND Health, abstracts of its publications, and ordering information can be found at www.rand.org/health. © 2015 RAND Corporation Limited Print and Electronic Distribution Rights This document and trademark(s) contained herein are protected by law. This representation of RAND intellectual property is provided for noncommercial use only. Unauthorized posting of this publication online is prohibited. Permission is given to duplicate this document for personal use only, as long as it is unaltered and complete. Permission is required from RAND to reproduce, or reuse in another form, any of its research documents for commercial use. For information on reprint and linking permissions, please visit www. rand.org/pubs/permissions.html. RAND® is a registered trademark. www.rand.org

Overview

What is the Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit?

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his Toolkit uses a train-the-trainer approach. It is intended to teach people about community resilience (CR) so that they can then teach others: what resilience is, things people can do to build resilience, and how to get involved in current efforts in DC, such as the Resilient DC initiative. This Toolkit has tips and information about CR for anyone in the community interested in this topic. It also has information and exercises that organizations can use to teach their staff and service populations (e.g., clients, members).

The Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit has two sections:

LEARN: This Toolkit educates community members or organizations about basic CR concepts. Even if you’re completely new to CR, this Toolkit will teach you so that you can teach others.

&TELL: After you’ve learned the essentials of CR, this Toolkit will provide you language and tools to tell others about CR. It has talking points for when you have just 5 minutes, 30 minutes, or up to an hour to talk about CR. It also offers resilience stories and games/activities to support your discussion. The TELL section works for an audience of one person all the way up to a staff meeting of many people.

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

Who can use this Toolkit? Community members interested in talking about resilience Non-profits Community-based organizations Businesses Faith-based organizations Government agencies Other types of organizations

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Overview

Table of contents How to use this Toolkit........................................................................................4 LEARN..................................................................................................................5 What is resilience and why should I be talking about it?..................................................................6 Building resilience is about action steps linked to things we do every day........................................9 Resilience case studies....................................................................................................................12 How DC residents can get engaged in building resilience..............................................................15

TELL...................................................................................................................17 5 minute TELL.............................................................................................................................18 5 minute essential CR talking points (an elevator pitch)..........................................................18 30 minute TELL...........................................................................................................................21 30 minute talking points.........................................................................................................21 30 minute activities.................................................................................................................24 Activity 1: CR conversation starters...................................................................................24 Activity 2: DC resilience stories video...............................................................................25 Activity 3: Icebreaker game—what makes your community unique?.................................26 60 minute TELL...........................................................................................................................27 60 minute talking points.........................................................................................................28 60 minute activities.................................................................................................................29 Activity 4: Washington DC Infographic on CR.................................................................29 Activity 5: Resilience BINGO!..........................................................................................30 Activity 6: Role plays illustrating responses to CR questions..............................................35

Additional community resilience resources......................................................37 Resilient DC one-page summary.......................................................................39 Community resilience one-page tear out..........................................................41

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

How to use this Toolkit There is no right or wrong way to use this Toolkit. If you plan to print this Toolkit, please print it double-sided and staple it as a booklet. If you want to teach yourself about community resilience and then teach others, here is what we recommend you do:

Learn about resilience 1) Read and review the LEARN section until you feel confident you can describe what resilience is, describe what it means to be a resilient community, and identify action steps you can do to build resilience. 2) Read and review the 5 minute TELL section. There are essential CR talking points for both community members and organizations. Read the talking points that are right for you. 3) Practice saying the essential talking points in the 5 minute TELL section out loud. 4) Walk through Activity 1: CR conversation starters. 5) Watch the DC resilience stories video (Activity 2) and answer the questions.

Teach others about resilience Consider your audience. Is it one person or a group of people? Think about how much time you have to talk about resilience. Then select tools from the Toolkit based on audience and time. 1) Always start with the 5 minute essential CR talking points in the TELL section. 2) Depending on how much time you have, you can add more talking points from the 30 or 60 minute TELL sections. 3) If you are talking to fewer than five (5) audience members, you can do any of the following activities: Activity 1: CR conversation starters Activity 2: DC resilience stories video Activity 4: Washington DC infographic on CR 4) If you are talking to six (6) or more audience members, you can do any of the following activities: Activity 1: CR conversation starters Activity 2: DC resilience stories video Activity 3: Icebreaker game Activity 4: Washington DC infographic on CR Activity 5: Resilience BINGO! Activity 6: Role plays illustrating responses to CR questions 4

Section I: LEARN

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n this section, you’ll LEARN about basic community resilience concepts, so you can start TELLing other people or organizations about what they can do to build a more resilient community.

LEARN

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

What is resilience and why should I be talking about it? Defining community resilience Resilience is the ability of communities to withstand and recover from community stressors as well as to learn from past stressors to strengthen future response and recovery efforts. A resilient community can:

Determine what it needs to reduce damage and to use its assets or resources wisely. The community is resourceful with what it has, no matter its condition or whether it has a lot of resources.

What is a community stressor?

Not only bounce back quickly, but take the opportunity to continue to strengthen health, social, and economic systems

Weather-related disasters (e.g., hurricanes or severe snowstorms)

Learn from past emergencies so that it can be better prepared for the next response

A community stressor is an event that negatively impacts a community physically, emotionally, or economically. Stressors differ by communities, but examples include:

Economic downturns or high poverty rates Gun violence or drug-related crimes Environmental issues (e.g., climate change or global warming)

Why does resilience matter? Different communities are stressed by different things. Whatever the stressors are, we all want to deal with them quickly and effectively. We don’t always know when the next stressor is going to happen, but it’s going to happen. Take, for example, weather-related emergencies. DC government agencies do the best job they can to 6

Section I: LEARN

address these emergencies, but they can’t get to everyone right away. That’s why we need to think about building more resilient communities. If you are someone who needs help in an emergency, you may need to rely on people you know. And if you can take care of yourself in an emergency, maybe you should think about folks you know who can’t. In a resilient community, helpers are already connected to those who need help so they can act fast when emergencies happen. Stressors can also affect organizations. When organizations don’t recover quickly, their employees, service populations, and communities are also affected. Employees may not be able to return to work right away. The services that organizations provide may be delayed or not restored. Think back to Jersey Shore businesses after Hurricane Sandy or the Snowmageddon in Washington, DC. For all these reasons, we have to think more about making our communities more resilient to stressors. That’s why we created the LEARN & TELL Toolkit. We want to educate people about community resilience and give them the tools to teach others about it.

What does it mean to be a resilient community? A resilient community is also a healthy community. Below is a list of key characteristics of a resilient (and healthy) community.

Community members are physically and mentally well People can access health care, healthy foods, and services they need Folks are self-sufficient and can take care of each other during tough times Residents are engaged in the community and connected to each other Communities can be resilient in other ways that are not listed above. Can you think of some other ways that your community is resilient? Doing things in your daily life through work, volunteering, or social activities that contribute to these characteristics means you are helping to build a more resilient community.

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

Why is resilience different than being prepared for disasters (e.g., getting supplies and having emergency plans)? Resilience is a way of linking disaster preparedness with all of the other activities that help a community flourish, socially and economically. The idea is that healthy communities can respond to and recover far more quickly from any type of disaster—big or small. The contrast between traditional disaster preparedness and a community resilience approach1

Traditional Disaster Preparedness Approach Focuses On:

Community Resilience Approach Focuses On:

Individual households and their readiness to respond to emergencies

Community members working together to respond to and recover from emergencies

Disaster-specific functions

Merging of other community efforts that build social, economic, and health well-being

Government’s response in the first few days and weeks after a disaster

Diverse network of government and nongovernmental organizations in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from disaster

Emergency plans and supplies only

Collaboration and engagement of the whole of community for problemsolving

Self-sufficient individuals or households

Self-sufficient community through neighbor-to-neighbor connections and strong social networks

Uscher-Pines, L., Chandra, A., Acosta, J., The promise and pitfalls of community resilience. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2013 Dec; 7(6):603-6

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Section I: LEARN

Building resilience is about action steps linked to things we do every day. Building a community’s resilience is about working with what the community has Some people think that resilience is just an idea to think about, but it’s more than that. Building resilience is about actions steps that you can take. The question is: how do you figure out what action steps you can take? The answer is easier than you think. Your resilience-building action steps can be things you already do every day. For example, remember, building a healthy and resilient community is about what you bring to the table. Here are some more examples:

Connect to people in your community. Whether you are someone who needs help or someone who can give help, connect to people through everyday activities. Say hi to a neighbor you haven’t met before. Talk to people at a block party. Communities with connected people can be more resilient during emergencies.

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

Building a community’s resilience is about working with what the community has (continued) Learn new skills or use the ones you already have. You can learn First Aid, CPR, or other disaster-specific skills. But you can also use the skills you already have: If you can cook, then you can help feed people when there’s an emergency. If you drive, you can help people get to appointments if public transportation is not working. If you’re good at organizing barbeques or block parties, you can organize your neighborhood’s responses to community stressors. If you are bilingual, you can translate for folks in your community during an emergency. If you are a counselor, you can provide psychological first aid to people when your community needs comforting.

The important thing is to put yourself out there when a community stressor happens and do things you already know how to do.

There are simple action steps an organization can take to be more resilient Organizations may want to improve their own resilience because so many people (e.g., their staff and service populations) depend on them. As the cornerstones of many communities, organizations should strive to keep their doors open. Just like in the community, building an organization’s resilience is based on simple actions. Consider these simple actions with your staff to build resilience:

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Section I: LEARN

Develop a list of what your organization has (e.g., competencies, people, money, infrastructure, equipment, services, relationships, etc.). How can these things be used during and after an emergency? Develop a list of where your organization may have weaknesses (e.g., lack of partnerships in key sectors, the need to build up operational funds for use during emergencies, etc.). What can you do now to improve them? Think about trainings to help employees be prepared at home. Consider the potential needs of your clients or constituents when community stressors happen. Think about what your organization can do with the skillsets it already has to address those needs.

For a more comprehensive list of activities to improve organizational resilience, please go to: Community Resilience Action List http://www.rand.org/pubs/tools/TL109.html

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

Resilience case studies Below are examples of how DC residents can learn from previous community stressors and take action steps between stressors to build resilience. Take a look at these examples and then think about things you learned from your last disaster. What action steps can you take now to be more resilient to the next disaster? Community Stressor Scenario I: DERECHO

DC Stressor: In the summer of 2012, a derecho unexpectedly knocked out power for a large number of DC residents for a long period of time.

Community response was: Community members with generators created makeshift charging stations so that neighbors could charge their phones. Households with air conditioning invited neighbors into their homes.

Potential CR action steps: Neighborhood committees could later create an “asset map” of their neighborhood, so they would know who has what before the next emergency. They can plan to coordinate check-ins with elderly or disabled residents, and make sure all residents have enough food and water.

What did we learn? Building CR in communities is about working together and working with what you have. Weatherrelated emergencies are going to happen in the DC area. It makes sense to coordinate a little now so your entire community will feel safe and ready the next time bad weather happens. 12

Section I: LEARN

Community Stressor Scenario II: ADDRESSING THE NEEDS OF AN AGING POPULATION

DC Stressor: Residents of Cleveland Park and Woodley Park wanted to stay in their communities as they aged, but it can be challenging.

Community response was: Held a series of conversations in living rooms and around kitchen tables about how to form a Senior Village in their community.

Real-life CR action steps: Residents established the Cleveland & Woodley Park Village. The Village is a partnership in which volunteers help seniors in the neighborhood with daily activities, such as transportation to appointments and cultural events, yard work, grocery shopping, and many other tasks, large or small. Member individuals and households pay annual dues to participate.

What did we learn? Identifying community stressors is the first step to developing smart solutions. Not every stressor is an event that begins and ends; sometimes stressors need long-term interventions. Think about a stressor in your community that needs a long-term intervention and what kind of planning and resources it would require. 13

Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

Community Stressor Scenario III: BLOOMINGDALE FLOODS

DC Stressor: Routine flooding in Bloomingdale always occurs during extreme rainstorms.

Community response was: Community members prepare the neighborhood by helping to distribute sand bags before a storm.

Real-life CR action steps: Residents formed a new organization to better address their problem. The Bloomingdale Civic Association now coordinates efforts for storm preparation and cleanup after flooding. It continues to work with the Mayor’s office to identify short-and longterm solutions.

What did we learn? Some community stressors need support from folks outside of the community to address them. In these situations, communities may need to draw from advocacy, development, and other practices to effectively engage external support. 14

Section I: LEARN

How DC residents can get engaged in building resilience Opportunities to build DC resilience with different organizations Many DC government agencies provide opportunities for DC residents to participate in resilience building activities. For more information, follow the links below. Resilient DC www.doh.dc.gov/resilience DC DOH Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Administration http://doh.dc.gov/node/147162 Serve DC http://serve.dc.gov/service/community-emergency-response-team-cert-training DC Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency http://hsema.dc.gov/

Resilient DC goals and activities Resilient DC is a DC Department of Health initiative to build strong organizations and individuals that can adapt to and overcome disasters, and get smarter about how to deal with disasters in the future. Resilient DC is a unique initiative to convene a diverse group of stakeholders to promote community well-being and simultaneously prepare the community for emergency conditions. Resilient DC’s main goals and activities are: facilitating connections between and among organizations and government agencies, including people from all sectors, planning for resilience building activities, and implementing resilience strategies for DC. Partners of this initiative include the Age-Friendly DC initiative, Serve DC, and the District Department of the Environment (DDOE). In addition to working together to develop and implement a strategic plan for increasing community resilience in DC, Resilient DC partners are developing a number of activities that target specific groups, including a Youth Resilience Corps and a DC community resilience strategic plan.

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

Guidance on how to join Resilient DC and what to do My organization’s sector is [business, faith-based, social services, etc.]—how do I participate in Resilient DC? Organizations from all sectors are the cornerstone of Resilient DC stakeholders. They help to set the agenda of Resilient DC and tell us how Resilient DC can help them with CR issues. They tell us about services and events in their sectors that help build resilience in DC. They also work with each other on CR issues, both within and across sectors. If your organization wants to network with other organizations about CR, get involved with the Resilient DC initiative. Start by joining the Resilient DC listserv (email [email protected]). I am a resident, how do I get involved in Resilient DC? DC residents can get involved directly with Resilient DC by attending our community forums, attending other resilience events with Resilient DC partners, and using the tools we offer to talk to other folks about resilience. DC residents do not have to represent an organization to serve as a Resilient DC stakeholder, so please join the Resilient DC listserv (email [email protected]) today!

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Section II: TELL

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ow that you’ve finished LEARNing about community resilience, you’re ready to start TELLing other people about it. In this section, we provide you with some language and tools to help you tell one person or many about what they can do to build a more resilient community.

TELL L

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

5 minute TELL Opportunities may arise when you might want to talk about resilience. There are examples of opportunities in this section, along with things you can say about resilience.

At an Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner (ANC) meeting, residents David and Paula bring up some recent community stressors that have happened in the neighborhood. A series of break-ins, including most recently at the community center, have left folks in the neighborhood feeling unsafe and anxious. They are looking for ways to help the community center get back on its feet. They also want to help residents deal with their feelings about what happened.

5 minute essential CR talking points (an elevator pitch) For community members People don’t always have time for a long discussion about an idea that they haven’t heard about before, like CR. How would you explain resilience to one of them? What would you say? Here are some essential CR talking points you can give in just 5 minutes. Community stressors will happen: A community stressor is an event that negatively impacts a community physically, emotionally, or economically. Stressors, including disasters, can happen in any community.

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Section II: TELL

If you build resilience now, you’ll also improve your health. Some ways to build resilience are: 1. Connect to personal supports. Connect to your friends, family, and neighbors so you can rely on each other when community stressors happen. 2. Develop new or use existing skills. Develop new skills and abilities (e.g., CPR, first aid) or use existing skills (e.g., language fluency, cooking, pet care) today. You can use those skills to help yourself and others when community stressors happen. 3. Make a plan that will carry you through disaster. Plan for your medical and emotional needs if a disaster hits and your community has to recover. 4. Know your community. Know where your community’s resources are and how to get to them so you can help yourself and others. DOH is leading an effort to build resilience in DC: Resilient DC is a DC Department of Health initiative to build strong organizations and individuals that can adapt to and overcome community stressors, and get smarter about how to deal with stressors in the future. For organizations Say you are leading your neighborhood association or a business. Do you think you have a role in resilience? You do! In order to build resilient communities, we need organizations from all sectors (e.g., faith-based, cultural, social services, healthcare, to name a few). Organizations can contribute to CR with services or expertise they already have. Here are some CR talking points organizations can share with other organizations.

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

Community stressors will happen: A community stressor is an event that negatively impacts a community physically, emotionally, or economically. Stressors, including disasters, can affect your employees and your clients. If you build resilience to stressors now, your organization will be stronger. Some ways to build resilience are: 1. Connect to other organizations. Other organizations can be your lifeline when community stressors happen. Share resources and knowledge today. 2. Develop new or use existing skills. Make sure your organization builds skills to help respond to and recover from stressful events (employee CPR, psychological first aid) and help your community too. 3. Make a plan that will carry you through disaster. Create a “continuity of operations plan”—what to do when your organization is affected, how to continue working and taking care of staff. 4. Know your community. Identify ways that your organization can help your community in stressful times—what can your organization contribute to those in need, and where are they located? DOH is leading an effort to build resilience in DC: Resilient DC is a DC Department of Health initiative to build strong organizations and individuals that can adapt to and overcome community stressors, and get smarter about how to deal with stressors in the future.

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Section II: TELL

30 minute TELL David and Paula are so interested in resilience now that you’ve spoken to them that they want you to present at their homeowners association meeting. They tell you that this meeting always sets aside 30 minutes to address community issues.

30 minute talking points It’s still important to communicate the essentials of CR to your audience. When you have 30 minutes, start with the Essential CR talking points described in the 5 minute TELL section of this Toolkit. If you have 30 minutes to talk about resilience, you can use some of the tools in this Toolkit. The tools help your audience connect with what you are telling them about community resilience. Remember, TELLing isn’t just about you doing all the talking—it’s about engaging people in a discussion. And don’t forget: these tools work for an audience of one or many.

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

For community members Building resilience is about action steps linked to things we do every day. Here are some more examples of action steps you can do to build resilience: You organize the annual block party and know who lives where. When a community stressor happens, you can organize checking in on folks who need help. Connect to preparedness or CPR training opportunities in DC at FEMA, Red Cross, or Serve DC. Not all community stressors are weather-related! Join or create organizations to address issues that matter to your community (e.g., building a greener community, better traffic safety, etc.). Work with the resources your community has. Are you and your neighbors members of the same house of worship? Or homeowners association? Use that organization to help organize your resources for the next community stressor!

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Section II: TELL

For organizations Building resilience is about action steps linked to things your organization already does. Here are some more examples of action steps you can do to build resilience for your organization and your community: Partner with organizations that can address the emergency needs of your service population when you are dealing with a stressor. Expand your services or expertise to help your community during a disaster. If you help people get benefits like SNAP (food stamps), help people get emergency SNAP during a disaster. If you provide mental health services, train your staff to provide Psychological First Aid (PFA) so they can volunteer during natural or manmade disasters. Make more plans for your organization! Check your insurance policy and make sure you know what it covers. Make sure you can communicate with your staff no matter what’s going on. Build financial reserves so you can operate even in a disaster. Create or join networks (e.g., healthcare coalition) to connect to other organizations that work on issues that matter to your community.

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

30 minute activities Below, we present three activities that are great for starting the conversation about resilience. If you have time for just one, choose your favorite. If you have more time, do more! Activity 1: CR conversation starters

Show your audience the images (conversation starters) below. You can show them just one of the images (choose your favorite) or all three depending on how much time you have. Don’t tell them anything about the images; instead try to get them to tell you what they think. For each of the images, you can ask them the following questions: 1. What do you think happened to people living here? 2. What do they need to do to recover and how long does that take? 3. What kind of things can people do to be more resilient to these kinds of serious events? 4. If you have experienced one of these situations, what would you do to be more resilient the next time?

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Section II: TELL

A residential street in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina Graphic of snow accumulation from “Snowmaggedon” in 2010

Washington DC Navy Yard shooting on September 16, 2013.

Activity 2: DC resilience stories video

The DC resilience stories video is available on DVD. For a copy of the DVD, please email [email protected] After the video has ended, ask your audience the following questions: 1. What makes the people in this story resilient?

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

2. What action steps did they take to make sure they could be more resilient to the next community stressor? 3. Think about a time when you (or someone you know) faced a tough situation (e.g., damage to home from a storm, drug violence in the neighborhood). How did you or they handle the situation? Activity 3: Icebreaker game—what makes your community unique?

This icebreaker game can help your audience see how natural or manmade disasters can impact communities in unexpected ways. This game is best played with a minimum of 6 people. What you need to play the game: One blank piece of paper for each person playing the game A pencil or pen for each person playing the game Here are the instructions for playing the game: 1. Hand out a piece of paper and a pencil or pen to each person. 2. Read the following paragraph together with your audience:

Take a moment to think about all the things that make your community unique. Then write all those things down all over the paper—try to fill up the paper with the things that make your community unique. Are there certain foods that your community makes? What about music? Or museums? How about history? Or culture? What about notable people or landmarks? Keep thinking and keep writing.

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Section II: TELL

3. Now that you’ve got all the things that make your community unique, fold the paper in half with the writing turned inward and write the name of your community on one of the blank sides. 4. Now imagine your community was impacted by a flood or a hurricane. Tear off a piece of that paper. How about an economic crisis? Tear off another piece of that paper. How about a rash of community shootings? Tear off another piece of that paper. Finally, how about a large fire? Tear off one more piece of that paper. 5. Now open your paper back up and take a look at what is left. Think about what is missing. Here is the next set of instructions for playing the game: 1. Have all the players break into groups of 2 or 3. 2. Ask them the following question:

What are 2 or 3 things that you or your organization could do today to help prepare for or prevent the loss of the things that make your community unique if a disaster were to strike tomorrow?

3. Give groups 5–10 minutes to brainstorm answers to the question. Then have groups present their answers to the entire audience for discussion.

60 minute TELL David and Paula lead a non-profit social service organization in your neighborhood. They thought the homeowners association meeting went really well, so they have asked you to teach their staff members about resilience. They have given you 60 minutes to “help the staff understand how important building resilience is.” They want their staff to be as passionate about resilience as they are!

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

60 minute talking points If you have 60 minutes to talk about resilience, you can cover a lot of CR topics! You can talk about CR essentials. You can present CR action steps. And you can tell people to get involved in making DC a more resilient place to live! Start with the 5 minute Essential CR Talking Points and talking points from the 30 minute TELL, but then finish up with information about what folks can do to build resilience in DC. See the Additional community resilience resources section on page 37 for more information. Below we offer some more activities that you can choose from, depending on how much time you have. For community members DC residents can get involved directly with Resilient DC by: Attending Resilient DC community forums to talk about resilience issues in DC Using the tools Resilient DC offers to talk about and build resilience Staying connected to resilience building activities of Resilient DC partners: Age-Friendly DC initiative, Serve DC, and the District Department of the Environment For organizations Become an organization member of Resilient DC! Here is what organization members do: Help decide what the key resilience-building activities for Resilient DC are annually. Tell leadership about the best ways Resilient DC help organizations build CR in the community. Keep Resilient DC up to date about services and events in their own sectors (e.g. social services, faith-based, etc.) that help build resilience in DC. Work with other organizations on CR issues, both within and across sectors. 28

Section II: TELL

60 minute activities Activity 4: Washington DC infographic on CR

Show your audience the DC infographic below on DC’s approach to building resilience. Walk your audience through the Path to Resilience. Ask the audience to discuss each of the Resilience Tips and provide examples of what they could personally to fulfill each of the Tips.

PATH TO RESILIENCE

CONNECT with neighbors and organizations TODAY to be STRONGER and more resilient TOMORROW! Tip 1:

CPR

DEVELOP NEW OR USE EXISTING SKILLS

DISASTER SKILLS THE BIG CHAIR

RESILIENCE TIPS REC CENTERS UNIQUE ABILITIES

Chili BOWL

hello ¡hola

Tip 4:

SHELTERS

KNOW YOUR COMMUNITY

CHILI

HEALTH CENTERS

Tip 2: MAKE A PLAN TO CARRY YOU THROUGH DISASTER

FRIENDS

MEDICATIONS & SUPPLIES

O2

FAMILY

+ + - -

SERVICE ANIMAL FOOD

NEIGHBORS

Tip 3: COMFORT ITEMS

CONNECT TO YOUR PERSONAL SUPPORTS

CONNECT TODAY / STRONGER TOMORROW

Resilient D.C. is a DC Department of Health initiative to build strong organizations and individuals that can adapt to and overcome disasters, and get smarter about how to deal with disasters in the future.

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

Activity 5: Resilience BINGO!

This is a game that helps your audience think about what they need to build resilience for themselves and their communities. This game is best played with a minimum of 6 people. What you need to play the game: One BINGO grid for each person playing the game A pencil or pen for each person playing the game Here are the instructions for playing the game: 1. Hand out a BINGO grid (see page 33) and a pencil to each person. 2. Read the following paragraphs together with your audience.

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Part of building resilience is getting to know: Your strengths, skills, and abilities: These can include trainings that help develop your resilience skills such as CPR/first aid and Community Emergency Response Team training. You may also have unique skills that can help others during a disaster, such as providing emotional support, keeping others calm, speaking other languages, preparing meals, driving people to appointments, or helping with child or pet care. Your health and medical needs: You should inventory any special medical equipment you will need access to during a disaster, such as medications, oxygen, wheelchair batteries, food for a service animal, or catheters. You should also participate in daily activities to strengthen your health, such as exercising, eating a healthy diet, and getting routine physicals. Your support network: Your support network should include neighbors, relatives, friends, care providers, and co-workers who know your particular needs and can assist during an emergency or a non-emergency, such as faith-based groups, recreational clubs or senior villages. Your community resources: Understand where the resources in your community are, such as shelter sites, recreational centers, dialysis centers, and community-based health facilities.

3. Play Resilience BINGO! In each BINGO square you will record your ideas about the types of: strengths, skills, and abilities; health and medical needs; support network; and community resources that you have for building resilience. 4. After you write those things down in the BINGO squares, walk over to others in the room to find folks with the same ideas written in their BINGO squares. When you find a match, write that person’s name in the square and keep going! The first person to write names in five squares across or down should shout out “Resilience BINGO!” Good luck! 31

Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

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Section II: TELL

Resilience BINGO! Strength, skill, or ability you possess:

Strength, skill, or ability you possess:

Strength, skill, or ability you possess:

Strength, skill, or ability you possess:

Strength, skill, or ability you possess:

Health or medical need you think important to inventory:

Health or medical need you think important to inventory:

Health or medical need you think important to inventory:

Health or medical need you think important to inventory:

Health or medical need you think important to inventory:

Type of person that is in your support network (e.g., neighbor, friend):

Type of person that is in your support network (e.g., neighbor, friend):

A resource in your community:

A resource in your community:

A resource in your community:

Health or medical need you think important to inventory:

Type of person that is in your support network (e.g., neighbor, friend):

A resource in your community:

Strength, skill or ability you possess:

Type of person that is in your support network (e.g., neighbor, friend):

Type of person that is in your support network (e.g., neighbor, friend):

Type of person that is in your support network (e.g., neighbor, friend):

A resource in your community:

A resource in your community:

FREE SPACE!

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Section II: TELL

Activity 6: Role plays illustrating responses to CR questions

In this activity, you can teach audience members how to talk to other people about resilience through role plays. Here we present two role-playing scenarios. Each scenario involves two characters: one that has questions about resilience and another that answers the questions about resilience. If you have an audience of more than one person, you can pair everyone up. If you have an audience of one person, you can partner with that person. You can have the audience work on just one role play or you can split them up and do both role plays. Here are the instructions you should give your audience about the role plays: 1. Each scenario involves two characters: one that has questions about resilience and another that answers the questions about resilience. 2. We are going to read the scenario(s) together. 3. You and your partner are going to decide who is going to be which character. 4. The role play exercise is about writing dialogue for the characters and then performing it. 5. If you are the character that has questions about resilience, write at least three questions about resilience. 6. If you are the character that responds to the questions, write the responses. 7. You have 10 minutes to work with each other and then role play pairs can present. Tips for writing the role play dialogue: Think about the scenario and who the character is! The fun part of role plays is thinking and talking in the mindset of the character. When you are writing the dialogue, think about your own unanswered questions about resilience. Also, think about what you’ve learned today at this meeting and use it to help you respond to questions.

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

Scenario 1: Talking to folks who do not know about community resilience and why it is important

?

David is the Executive Director of a social service organization located in Mount Pleasant. His service population is mostly Spanish-speaking. He is not familiar with community resilience and is not sure how his organization can contribute since they do not work in emergency preparedness. A person at a partner organization wants to convince David to think about how his organization can work to improve resilience in Mount Pleasant. David does not think this is a good use of his organization’s time.

Things to think about when writing for this role play: What do you think is confusing David about community resilience? What are some key messages to share with David about community resilience? Why is it important for David’s organization to contribute to the resilience of Mount Pleasant? Scenario 2: Talking to folks about community resilience action steps

Paula is the director of a senior wellness center in DC. She has attended a few Resilient DC community forums and is very excited about doing some things to build resilience with her seniors. She has a lot of ideas for actions that the senior wellness center could do to build resilience in the community. And she wants to help seniors get involved directly in building their own resilience. But she is not sure where to start. She has asked you to help her think about two things: 1) what are the best resilience building action steps for her seniors and 2) what are the best resilience building action steps the senior wellness center could take for the broader community?

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Resources

Things to think about when writing for this role play: What are key factors to think about when choosing resilience action steps? What are things that are important to seniors in terms of resilience? What are the differences between the senior wellness center’s role and the seniors’ role in resilience?

Additional community resilience resources To learn more about community resilience, take a look at these trainings, websites, and reports. A Path to Preparedness http://odr.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/odr/release_content/attachments/Path%20to%20 Preparedness_PDF.pdf Take an action step approach to guide your organization and community in building resilience

Building Resilient Communities: An Online Training http://www.rand.org/pubs/tools/TL109.html Check out more research on what makes a community resilient

RAND Community Resilience http://www.rand.org/resilience-in-action.html Learn more about how other communities are thinking about resilience

100 Resilient Cities Decennial Challenge http://100resilientcities.rockefellerfoundation.org/ Business/Media

Plan and protect your business http://www.ready.gov/business Disaster Help Desk for Business http://ccc.uschamber.com/site-page/disaster-help-desk-business Public-private partnerships to strengthen regional resilience http://www.bens.org/pages/policy-work/public-private-partnerships-

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Community Resilience LEARN and TELL Toolkit

Cultural/Faith-based

Faith Based Organizations Community of Practice http://www.community.fema.gov/connect.ti/FAITH_COP/groupHome U.S. Department of Homeland Security Center for Faith-based & Neighborhood Partnerships http://www.dhs.gov/dhs-center-faith-based-neighborhood-partnerships Emergency Management/Healthcare

America’s PrepareAthon http://www.community.fema.gov/connect.ti/AmericasPrepareathon District of Columbia Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency http://hsema.dc.gov/ Ready.gov Citizen Corps http://www.ready.gov/citizen-corps U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response http://www.phe.gov/Preparedness/planning/abc/Pages/community.aspx http://www.phe.gov/Preparedness/planning/hpp/Pages/overview.aspx American Red Cross http://www.redcross.org/dc/washington Social Services

Lutheran Social Services http://www.lssnca.org/ United Way http://www.unitedway.org/our-work/disaster-recovery/ Other

Center for Clean Air Policy Resource Library http://ccap.org/resource-library/ Community & Regional Resilience Institute http://www.resilientus.org/

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Resources

Resilient DC one-page summary Make copies of this Resilient DC summary to share with DC residents when you use the Toolkit in your community!

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Resources

Community resilience one-page tear out Take this page with you as a “cheat sheet” for responses to frequently asked questions about CR!

What is community resilience? Community resilience is the ability of communities to withstand and recover from disasters as well as to learn from past disasters to strengthen future response and recovery efforts.

What is the difference between community resilience and disaster preparedness (e.g., getting supplies and having emergency plans)? Resilience is a way of linking disaster preparedness with all of the other activities that help a community flourish, socially and economically. The idea is that healthy communities can respond to and recover more quickly from any type of disaster—big or small.

What are some actions that I can take to make my community and myself more resilient? 1. Connect to personal supports.

Connect to your friends, family, and neighbors so you can rely on each other when disaster strikes.

2. Develop new or use existing skills.

Develop new skills and abilities (e.g., CPR, first aid) or use existing skills (e.g., language fluency, cooking, pet care) today. You can use those skills to help yourself and others during a disaster.

3. Make a plan that will carry you through disaster. Plan for your medical and emotional needs if a disaster hits and your community has to recover. 4. Know your community.

Know where your community’s resources are and how to get to them so you can help yourself and others.

What is Resilient DC? Resilient DC is a DC Department of Health initiative to build strong organizations and individuals that can adapt to and overcome disasters, and get smarter about how to deal with disasters in the future.

How can I participate in Resilient DC? Community members and organizations can get involved directly with Resilient DC by attending our community forums and meetings, as well as use the tools we offer to talk to other folks about resilience. You do not have to represent an organization to serve as a Resilient DC stakeholder, so please join the Resilient DC listserv (email [email protected]) today!

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